LIttle Known Black History Month: William Peyton Hubbard

William Peyton Hubbard, the first notable Black elected official in Toronto, and will be honored this weekend with the unveiling of a park in his name. Hubbard, the son of slaves, came to politics when he was in his fifties. Hubbard was born in 1842 in an area just outside of Toronto known as “The Bush,” […]

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Little Known Black History Fact: Dayton Riots

The city of Dayton, Ohio is one of the most racially segregated cities in America, and a race-fueled riot that occurred on this day in 1966 only widened that divide. The senseless killing of a Black business owner and West Side Dayton resident was the tipping point for the riots, and the region has yet […]

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Little Known Black History Fact: Hazel Ingram

Hazel Ingram made headlines last year after working 60-plus years at New York’s Douglas Elliman offices on Madison Avenue \ as a cleaner. Ms. Ingram is back in the news again after she was named as part of New York’s Electoral College body in this year’s presidential election. Ingram, 93, was named an elector earlier this […]

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Little Known Black History Fact: Jane E. Elliott

Mrs. Jane E. Elliott was the first person to establish a cafeteria system at a Black college, and reportedly the first to do so in the Deep South. Beyond her historic contribution, Mrs. Elliott is the great-aunt of our own Tom Joyner and her memory lives on at Tennessee State University. In 1924, Elliott established […]

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Little Known Black History Fact: C.R. Patterson And Sons

The C. R. Patterson & Sons Company was the first Black-owned automobile manufacturer in the United States. The company was initially began by a former slave and his eldest son took the family business to greater heights in the early 20th Century. Charles Richard Patterson was a former slave who escaped captivity in Virginia, then […]

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